Offbeat in Iceland

I know, I know. Iceland has been on travel bucket lists and on itineraries of cruise ships. Iceland has become very trendy for layovers before you hit North America. Iceland has been on the news due to masses of tourists entering this peaceful place. Restrictions?

Iceland

No, do not restrict people to go to Iceland, but show them their wide ranged options. There are hundreds (more, thousands) of places you can stop, enjoy the views, eat, have picnics, listen to music or just hang out for a while. Simple as that:

Iceland is worth every single ISK. Every single euro. Every single dollar. And you will spend loads.

I decided to go to Iceland because friends of mine from the states were getting married. They picked the land of fire and ice to say Yes! and invited me to come along. Well, I am not the only one who followed their invitation. I know Marcus and Gwen from a while ago when I traveled the US east coast in 2012. I met up with them in Prague and Vienna, hiked Torres del Paine in Chile with them and became part of their travel group. As a matter of fact: I am very happy for them!

The couple!
The beautiful couple Gwen & Marcus

As well, I am very happy for myself to spend some crazy nice days on an island I would have not gone to this time of the year. These are some of the spots I recommend you to go off the beaten path:

Museum of Sorcery and Witchcraft in Hólmavik and the Arctic Fox Rescue Center

As you know, I love stories. I love to tell them and I also love to listen to new ones. Iceland is full of stories and people who want to tell them. I stayed with Mila, in her Helgugata Guesthouse in Borgarnes at the West coast. It was a good deal to stay at her place because only 90 Euros per night, breakfast included is a cheap (plus comfortable) night. She has a three story house, very nice interior and magnificent friends. I met Masha, her friend from Georgia who now married to an Icelandic, lives there, collects Danish design objects and works for the police force as a translator. How cool is that?

From Borgarnes it is only a 2 hour drive to Hólmavik entering the Westfjords. Hólmavik is a charming and quiet little town but has two major attractions: The Museum of Sorcery and Witchcraft and the Arctic Fox Rescue Center.

Arctic Fox

Fisherman Café, Restaurant and Hotel in Suðureyri

Hitting the Westfjords of Iceland was probably the best decision made. Why? Because there were barely any tourists around. Suðureyri is a little fisherman village which as only become part of mainland Iceland through a tunnel in 1996. I was absolutely fascinated of the beauty and rawness of the fjord belonging to Ísafjarðarbær. How did I find out of this special place? I looked up sustainably but touristically interesting tours in Iceland which were off the beaten path. Fisherman Seafood Trail was one of them.

Fjords, Sudureyri

Peter and Eva invited me to be part of one of their tours which was not only a pleasure but mind-blowingly interesting. My guide invited me to a historical, yet foodie tour around the village, starting at the place where the first farm was situated a few hundred years ago. While fishermen were trying to catch the best fish in this raw area between fjords and rough sea, the farmers went to use the little land they had to grow potatoes (only during 19th century) and winter veg. On the plus side their fjord still offers them geothermal energy which means heating, warm water and relaxing pools are not a problem at all. Other than that they figured out how to survive in conditions like these, off from everything else, only reachable through the seaway. They got their protein and fat through dried fish. Hung in open stalls in the winter they could collect it and eat only one filet per week. Of course I tried some!

And now with the hammer I feel like Thor!

Fisherman Iceland

In Suðureyri the fish factories gather the most income and help rise economy. Yet, they are wonderful examples how to use everything of the fish, even fish head. On the trail I tasted fish cakes and freshly made Plokkfiskur (see the recipe in the link) !

Fisherman Iceland Fisherman IcelandFisherman Iceland

Westman Islands

For a very special getaway from ‘mainland’ Iceland take the ferry to Heimaey, which is part of the Westman Islands archipelago. It is the only inhabited island of the islands south of Iceland with a population around 4.200. The Westmans or Vestmannaeyjar as it is called in Icelandic have a rich history but even richer is their flora and fauna. While walking through lava sand and stones bedded in moss you look up and see the beautiful volcanos Helgafell and Eldfell. The second one only appeared through a major eruption in 1973 when the whole island had to be evacuated to Reykjavik. Houses, streets and everything left were covered in volcano ashes. You can find out more about this tragic yet force of nature event at the museum Eldheimar. I was mostly impressed of how many photos and videos of this time were taken.

Westman Islands At the very South, Westman Islands

Two Volcanos, Westman Islands

Plan your travels ahead

Rent a car or try to find someone to share a car with. I have found so many people traveling from Reykjavik to several destinations, only two or three people in the car. They have space. Use it!

Beauty of a car

After looking into bus times I decided to rent a car with Budget / Avis car services. It is very expensive and I would rather recommend a different deal. Look into local car rentals like SADcar. I have been following Route 1 and Route 60 for most of my travels there. It is concrete and very easy to drive on. You do not need 4×4 on your car. But it is always appreciated in Iceland to be prepared for the worst.

For going to the Westman Islands I decided to try public transport. I went with the local bus services Straeto (No. 52) to go to Landeyjahöfn to take the ferry Herjólfur to Heimaey. It is very inexpensive to go this way.

35 Euro for the bus ride (per direction)
12 Euro for the ferry (per direction)

More information about the Westfjords and Westman Islands. This trip was not sponsored or funded of any of the companies. I was happily invited to the Fisherman Seafood Trail.

Iceland

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Bus Around Ireland

For a sustainable lifestyle it’s not only important to know where your ingredients, your products and your clothes are coming from. I always try to take public transport. Of course, you are less flexible, you need to look at confusing timetables and the prices seem to be much more higher than just renting a car (which is a myth if you think about fuel and the renting fees).  In particular when you are traveling in a group (in this case, I would actually recommend a car). Good points! But if you are traveling solo, like I do most of the time, I tend to have a lot more fun on busses and trains. You meet people, you get to know the surroundings better since you don’t have to concentrate on driving and you can take a nap. Unfortunately, that’s rarely the case because I get stuck at the first two advantages of taking public transportation.

Bus or Train?

My recommendation if you think about taking the bus or the train is to look into prices. Busses (mostly Bus Éireann) are much cheaper and take you into town centre and to places afar from towns. You can talk to the driver to drop you at a different spot or ask where the best path for your hike is. Although you are not supposed to speak to the driver, they usually know their way around well to offer advice. Trains are only available in some towns and the railway system is not as widely connected as you might want to go. For instance, you cannot take a train to Donegal town. Train times are much more reliable than bus times since they do not get stuck in traffic. Plan ahead, and think about puffers for delayed busses (and trains). Always take a book (or better, an e-reader with you) and some music with you. The bus will arrive, eventually and will most of the time run smoothly. Going in and out of Dublin at rush hour is demanding. What is very convenient is that there is WiFi on public transport most times.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Unfortunately, this is not what Irish busses look like. But I’d have a go… © Lucie Täubler

Visit Ireland in 8 days without a car

I chose to visit places in Ireland I have not yet visited. One of them is County Donegal, which is way up north, de-located and hardly reachable by public transport. The Wild Atlantic Way starts in County Donegal (or ends there, whichever way you look at it). It is so worth the trip! After visiting some places in Donegal and Northern Ireland, I decided to go down to County Sligo and visit the beach in Strandhill. After two relaxing days there, I took a long journey through Galway into Limerick, where I went to see EVA international. The bus taking me down to Cork drove me through beautiful landscapes, lots of green.

Trips taken in 8 days

I took ten trips on busses and trains in only eight days and decided to go to Coleraine, Northern Ireland, by car with a friend, which was free of charge.

Costs in total

Onehundredandthirty Euros = 130 Euros

Hours traveling in total (incl. waits)

Twenty hours = 20 h

Fairy Trail in Donegal
You would find some of these little fairy doors around Donegal. Something to look closely into…

More info

You can easily work your way through with Google Maps or use Transport for Ireland which also comes with an app if you want it on your phone. I did not book way ahead which left me in the position to take whichever hostel had a free bed. So, for high season pre-book your accommodation via AirBnB, Hostelworld or whichever other platform you might be using.

This article has not been sponsored by any of the corporates named. 

Sustainable Glamping with Style in Carinthia

I really do not like the word ‚Glamping‘ which is a combination of Glamour and Camping. Why don’t I like it? You might ask yourself, and still it’s in the title. Well, I had the chance to travel with Austrian Umweltzeichen (find out more about Umweltzeichen here) to three different camping destinations – without a tent. The camping fans around here might shout out loud, Then that’s not camping at all!

I agree. But still, I had the advantages of camping – being within a natural surrounding, close to a river, a little aside of the next village and: in peace.

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So where is that, this peaceful camping I am talking about? I found it in three camp grounds in Carinthia, the southern parts of Austria.

Alpencamp Kötschach-Mauthen 

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The more Sepps, the better

Again? Another Sepp?, I thought to myself when I met Sepp Kolbitsch, the dynamic founder of Alpencamp in Kötschach-Mauthen. He is the second one within the last 24 hours. The last Sepp I have met was rather far away – speaking of Austrian distances – and was called Brandstätter, producing Gailtaler White Mais. This Sepp really made me dizzy after a few minutes. He is passionate of what he does here in Kötschach-Mauthen. He talks about the development of Alpencamp, his research with TU Vienna, his ideas and of course his plan for me in the next couple of days.

I will show you our general heating which is easily accessible for visitors. I know, it will be extremely technical but I want to let you know how we use our resources. – Sepp is starting of with some basics about his research project around the camp ground which can be looked up online. The heating is close to the main building and is able to learn. It is in charge of warm water which means it saves the heat and even stores it, to pull it off when a lot of camping guests want to shower at the same time (in different showers…). It amazes me how sustainable a camp ground can be.

We try to save water everywhere, we know how precious it is. We invested in sustainable shower heads. Instead of 20 liters per second, we cover only 4 liters per second, which is a huge difference… – Is that a problem if you want to wash your hair,… like long hair? – Not really, is the quick and true answer. The amount of water and pressure are perfect.

The food

Go to Valentinalm! It was total delisih to try their Kärntner Kasnudeln (Carinthian special pasta filled with cheese and covered in buttery chives)

Be active

After spending the morning at the camp house (made out of wood) take a run at the stream Gail which passes by. Or give the e-mountain bike a try.

Also, the amazing hiking paths around Kötschach-Mauthen are worth a try. Sepp number 3 turns out to be Sepp Lederer, who takes me to Plöckenpass to the Italian border. Mauthen, one part of the double village, is a Hiking Village (Bergsteigerdörfer) and Sepp is the main guy to ask about hiking paths, stories around hiking and flora around here. He has written several botanical books… so if you are there, try to find him!

Camping Rosental-Roz

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Quantastic!

Just a few kilometers from Gailtal into Rosental at the Slovenian border you find Gotschuchen. The wonderful camp ground is at a small lake. And here, there is it: peace! Katharina Kupper-Wernig and her team are full of energy and good vibes – they might not even stress out in peak season. Funny as it is, I am meeting the first guest who arrived at the camp ground 40 years ago. He was purely equipped for rain when he came here – and it was pouring rain for days – and he found shelter here. So I am glad, Camping Rosental-Roz is also made for non-camping experts.

Are you interested in quantum physics? I have found out that next to the main house Katharina’s husband Samo – himself researcher and professor for quantum physics – build EXPI (House full of experiments). It is a huge try out laboratory for children and adults. You may be working with the CERN or how acceleration of gravity works out…

Camping Rosental-Roz is due to its owners always space to be researched to be more sustainable.

The food

No one can beat Katharina’s breakfast. More! More? More! And of course she uses local products from the village our close by. The marvelous honey is produced by Michael Mlecnik who lives just around the corner.

Be active

Just walk to Radsberg, which is located North to river Drau. Apart from hiking you can also try paragliding.

But again, running is a very simple task next to a river. In Gotschuchen and around the small village there are several trail-running paths.

 

Ferien-Erlebniswelt Mössler

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Mystical mysterious Lake Millstatt

Finally it is raining and the drive to Lake Millstatt shows how mysterious Carinthia can get. At Ferien-Erlebniswelt Mössler I meet Georg Mössler who owns the campsite in Döbriach. Again, he is like Sepp and Katharina innovative and takes a lot time to research into new ways to save energy and water. There is enough space for families to hang out and play, to young or old couples to spend their holidays or to camping newbies to try out the mobile homes. I love the pool (Hello, Clamping!) and my little walks through the rain to the lake. On the way you pass several trees which refer to Celtic times. I imagine myself sitting there and relax. Or even meditate. Do yoga.

Döbriach offers a lot of options to spend rainy afternoons in the museum – like Sagamundo or just have a coffee and relax at the terrace.

The food

After a few hours on the mountain bike (with out e-) I am always really hungry. Charly’s See Lounge directly at the water is like beach but without the sea. Have a salad! It’s absolutely delicious! Oh and of course there is also beer. Uli Bacher, beer lover and brewer, opened a brewery not long ago: Shilling.

Be active

You can do so much here! One of my highlights was Gottlieb Strobl’s rowboat trip from one end to the other. I have never rowed before and was pretty messed up after a little go… but see yourself…

And as I already said, biking is huge here. You can go round the lake in just one day, 39k, up and down, sometimes with a great view onto the lake, sometimes in the forest.

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I am so happy I made my way down to the southern parts of Austria to meet three wonderful Sepps, Katharina, Georg and their families who understand how to innovate their camp sides and to make glamping great again. 😉

Find more pictures here.

*Thanks to Umweltzeichen for organizing this trip and for my travel partners Elena, Sabine and Tom and Angelika.